Stay up-to-date with AFF announcements, news from our panelists and filmmakers, film industry updates, and more.

Guest Blog: Flutter’s Eric Hueber

 Austin Film Festival is excited to present Audience Award winner in the Texas Independence category, Flutter! We’ve invited writer/director Eric Hueber to be a guest blogger and answer some questions: What are some advantages of shooting a film in a place like Austin or Texas in general? Wow. I could go in a hundred directions with this answer. First off, Texas is my home. I love it …

 Austin Film Festival is excited to present Audience Award winner in the Texas Independence category, Flutter! We’ve invited writer/director Eric Hueber to be a guest blogger and answer some questions:

What are some advantages of shooting a film in a place like Austin or Texas in general?

Wow. I could go in a hundred directions with this answer. First off, Texas is my home. I love it here, not because of some inherited tribal pride but because people here value the storytelling arts. I know it sounds trite to say but Texans love a tall tale and a little gossip. We appreciate stories about people big and small. As a kid and a teenager I felt stuck here, but now that I’m an adult and have the ability to leave, I couldn’t make myself go. After I finished my first feature, The Austin-American Statesman asked me during an interview where I was planning to move—New York or LA? The answer caught me off guard. For years I had been writing scripts about Texans that take place in Texas. I have no desire to go to a larger city and spend an exponentially greater amount of money to make films about people and places I don’t relate to.

What I love about Austin is that we have a film community. Community is a beautiful word. People here invest their time and talents to help others realize their ideas. Of course, there is commerce in that exchange, but there is also a great sense of devotion. We root for each other. We assist one another. We talk about ideas and here—story is god. We service the story, each other’s stories, and we do it with reverence. When I go to LA, people don’t talk about stories, they talk about “property.” There is no word in the film lexicon that I hate more than property. You can’t treat people’s dreams as if they are chattel, unless you have lots of money and a disenfranchised group of people desperate to get inside the cabal. It’s become an industry of bean counters trying to figure out how they can purchase someone else’s ideas, franchise them, give someone else the credit, and adulterate them until they are as commercially exploitable as possible. Fine, we all know the problem. “Community” and the democratization of the filmmaking process is the solution, and Austin thrives because of it. That’s why we consistently get voted as the “film friendliest” city in America. Here…your film matters.

In building your crew, how much did you pull from the local film community?

My entire crew was from Austin, except for a couple freelancers (hired by our producers) that came over from Houston. We were leery of them at first but they became family in no time. Ha! Everyone in the crew was a good personal friend of mine, or a personal recommend from one. It really felt like a familial endeavor. Most of the crew had read the script and cared about the story. Because of that, they anticipated well and adapted easily to the circumstances we had and the issues that arose. We had flow. It was quite magical to share that experience with my friends.

Here in Austin there are talented crews hungry for work. People work best when they are appreciated. I have experienced this both above and below the line. I am a camera operator as well. I love helping other people realize their stories. It’s satisfying, especially when people treat you with respect and value your contribution. The crews here are generous. It’s not something to be taken advantage of, it’s something to foster with a spirit of inclusiveness and gratitude. Films are logistically a nightmare to execute. Herding a mass of people and getting them inspired to make that slow moving ship more efficient is an art. I find that crews here in Austin are often comprised of filmmakers themselves rather than just technicians. As such, they can sometimes better anticipate in the macro sense what needs to happen next on a production. They see their effort as part of a creative synthesis, not merely a job. This is invaluable.

How did you balance your vision with your budget? Did you write the film around resources you knew you had access to?   

This is an interesting question. I had two other films that started to look like they might get traction and become legitimate productions, but funding failed to materialize for different reasons. So, my goal when I started writing Flutter was to write a script with no more than five actors and five locations. I wanted to write a script that I didn’t have to ask anybody for permission to shoot. Even then, I had a hard time keeping it within those parameters, but I started with actors and places that I knew I had access to and I wrote it around them. I tried to dream within those limits. I’m a fan of fantasy so budget constraints are a tough reality, but they can be a blessing as well. I see a lot of writers that try to create fantasy instead of magic realism. Life is pretty damn absurd. It’s amazing how surreal the juxtaposition of banal objects and circumstances can be when they are taken out of their expected context.

What’s the most important lesson about low-budget independent filmmaking that you learned from making Flutter?

The hardest lesson to accept is that however cheap you think your film is, forget it, it will cost three times as much.

Also, I already knew this because I have done short films that will never see the light of day but I was reminded how true it is—90% of filmmaking is casting. I am so proud of my cast. A talented cast makes you look good and they make your job easy. At the end of the day they are your story, end of story.

What advice would you give to aspiring Texas filmmakers who are trying to take that next step forward?

 Don’t wait for things to be perfect. Perfect is the enemy of good. Learn to enjoy the process. Making a film is such a herculean effort spanning years from concept to completion and presentation that if you don’t become devoted to the process you will never get to enjoy the results. Besides, if you fantasize about how cool it will be to premiere your film to red carpet and accolades instead of what it means to be in a darkened room with fellow humans connecting via a common experience, then you are in it for the wrong reasons.

Whether you are a writer, a director, a producer or all three—be active and work on your craft. Workshop your ideas and let others critique you. Don’t insulate yourself. Listen when someone tells you what isn’t working. People are critical and when you send your babies out into the real world nobody cares about your production restraints and creative caveats. You won’t be able to give qualifiers. Your work has to stand on its own.

Be realistic about your resources and focus your creativity around it. You can make Avatar in your backyard with some blue face paint and a camcorder. Everything is relative. It’s just a matter of scale. That being said, you can’t make films in a vacuum so always seek out other filmmakers, technicians and talent so you can broaden that pool. More than anything, don’t be an ass. Network with a goal for finding real camaraderie, not just assets. Film is about people. We make films to touch people after all.

What part of Flutter are you most proud of?

It’s a general answer but I am most proud of the film’s integrity. Flutter is not perfect by any means, but it is sincere. Nobody will ever know the film that I had in my head. It’s not that film, but I am content with the film that is now collectively experienced. In some ways I even like the real version better. I can’t take credit for it but I am so proud of the performances by the actors. They made the material resonate. They were wonderful and I acknowledge them with absolute gratitude. Secondly, I have to applaud the crew whose work may be faceless but is ever-present. The cinematography, the art direction, the scoring and the soundtrack all work because they service the story in a way that I believe is honest. It was made with love and you can feel it.

Who do you look to for filmmaking inspiration?

A while back, I wrote down a list of the filmmakers that have inspired me and I realized that to some degree or another most are writer-directors. I’m a fan of the Coen Brothers, Rian Johnson, Christopher Nolan, Charlie Kaufman, Andrew Dominik, Nicolas Winding Refn, David Gordon Green, Jeff Nichols, PT Anderson, Jaco Van Dormael, Emir Kusturica, Iñárritu, Jodorowsky, Jarmusch, Lynch, Linklater, Malick, Carpenter, Cronenberg and Herzog, among many others. Interestingly, several of those filmmakers live here in Austin. What I think they all have in common is the ability to make films that are intensely personal, even indulgent, but that are so raw and emotionally available that they challenge an audience to accept them on their terms. I don’t watch films to confirm my biases and placate my assumptions. I like to be challenged and surprised by a film. To a degree, we watch films vicariously so I feel like it’s a duty to confront people’s behaviors and fears. Otherwise, we aren’t seeking a greater humanity, just another Roman Circus. However, I don’t have some illusion that I can make the world a better place as a filmmaker—just a little less lonely for someone. The films I like probably have more of a sense of spiritual absurdism. These filmmakers make films that make me excited about the human experience, films that show me how unique and beautiful and tragic and absurd it all is. Great cinema just makes me feel that I am not alone. And that’s why I want to be a filmmaker.

Tickets are still available for this screening. To purchase a ticket click here.

 

READ MORE

Read the Oscar Nominated Screenplays

by Matt Dy, Screenplay & Teleplay Competition Director When the Oscars are handed out each year for the screenplay categories, I’ve always wondered how many voters actually read each nominated script.  For me, being so immersed in this crazy world of screenplay competitions, I can’t even fathom advancing a script without having read it.  For the Academy and other awards groups, reading a nominated script is …

by Matt Dy, Screenplay & Teleplay Competition Director

When the Oscars are handed out each year for the screenplay categories, I’ve always wondered how many voters actually read each nominated script.  For me, being so immersed in this crazy world of screenplay competitions, I can’t even fathom advancing a script without having read it.  For the Academy and other awards groups, reading a nominated script is less of a concern; strong dialogue performed by actors and the way the story unfolds through visuals are usually enough to assess the quality of a screenplay.  There’s absolutely nothing wrong with this but, when I hear the words “best screenplay”, I think of the actual written work.  The fact that a nominated script was ever read in the first place and then greenlit and produced is an achievement in and of itself for a writer.  However, I think for one to truly appreciate a screenplay, one must read it.  Which brings me to this…

Sure, you may have seen all of the nominated films but have you read all of them?  We’ve scoured the Internet to find all of the nominated screenplays and have them readily available for you to download here.  The only script that was a mystery to find (and I’m sure would be a mystery to read) is for Inherent Vice.  The following are all of the nominated scripts and my thoughts for what will win the Oscar.

Best Original Screenplay:
Boyhood: written by Richard Linklater
Birdman: written by Alejandro González Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, & Armando Bo
Foxcatcher: written by E. Max Frye & Dan Futterman
The Grand Budapest Hotel: written by Wes Anderson & Hugo Guinness
Nightcrawler: written by Dan Gilroy

Prediction: This is a tight race between Birdman and The Grand Budapest Hotel. Birdman is certainly the most original of the nominees and would match the Academy’s preference for the unique and quirky as with previous winners like Her, Django Unchained, and Midnight In Paris. Also, since Birdman is now the likely Best Picture winner, that top award almost always includes a corresponding best screenplay win. While The Grand Budapest Hotel does have a lot of support, I think the film will be passed over for this award and will be honored instead for Wes Anderson’s signature style in the production categories. However, the script has one of the best lines of dialogue that is so relevant for writers:

Best Adapted Screenplay:
American Sniper: written by Jason Hall
The Imitation Game: written by Graham Moore
The Theory of Everything: written by Anthony McCarten
Whiplash: written by Damien Chazelle

Inherent Vice: written by Paul Thomas Anderson

Prediction: Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl was sorely snubbed in this category and was presumed to be the early front-runner prior to the nominations announcement. Without it here, a case could be made for any of the nominees. Whiplash was oddly switched from an original screenplay to this category due to it being adapted from the short film it was based on. It could pull off an upset here but the likely winner is The Imitation Game. With the most nominations out of all the films in this category and Alan Turing’s life still a popular topic of discussion, it should pull off the win. Watch out for Whiplash though. One of the most memorable lines from that film seemed to have been cut down (correct me if I’m wrong) from a longer speech. It’s always interesting to see what was edited out of the script for the final cut. Here’s the whole speech:

 

 

If you think you have what it takes to correctly predict the Oscar winners, take a chance on our Oscars Prediction Contest. The top five entrants who most closely predict the winners in each category will each win one Lone Star Badge to the 2015 Austin Film Festival and Conference. For more information and to submit your predictions, click here.

Need some help predicting? I don’t even think a crystal ball will help with this very unpredictable year but, here are my predictions in all categories:

Best Picture: Birdman
Best Director: Alejandro González Iñárritu – Birdman
Best Adapted Screenplay: Graham Moore – The Imitation Game
Best Original Screenplay: Alejandro González Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, & Armando Bo – Birdman
Best Actor: Eddie Redmayne – The Theory of Everything
Best Actress: Julianne Moore – Still Alice
Best Supporting Actor: J.K. Simmons – Whiplash
Best Supporting Actress: Patricia Arquette – Boyhood
Best Cinematography: Birdman
Best Production Design: The Grand Budapest Hotel
Best Costume Design: The Grand Budapest Hotel
Best Hair & Makeup: The Grand Budapest Hotel
Best Visual Effects: Interstellar
Best Editing: Boyhood
Best Sound Mixing: American Sniper
Best Sound Editing: American Sniper
Best Original Score: The Theory of Everything
Best Original Song: “Glory” – Selma
Best Animated Feature: How to Train Your Dragon 2
Best Documentary Feature: Citizenfour
Best Foreign Language Film: Ida
Best Live Action Short: Aya
Best Animated Short: Feast
Best Documentary Short: Joanna

READ MORE

On Story Radio Show

We are pleased to announce the upcoming release of the On Story radio show as a continuation of our On Story® project! Hosted by the Austin NPR affiliate, KUT 90.5, the show’s one-hour documentary slots will showcase some of today’s most prolific voices in the film and television industry, sharing storytelling philosophies, anecdotes, and personal inspirations. Centered on storytelling through film and television and gleaned from …

We are pleased to announce the upcoming release of the On Story radio show as a continuation of our On Story® project! Hosted by the Austin NPR affiliate, KUT 90.5, the show’s one-hour documentary slots will showcase some of today’s most prolific voices in the film and television industry, sharing storytelling philosophies, anecdotes, and personal inspirations.

Centered on storytelling through film and television and gleaned from 21 years of archived footage from the annual Festival and Screenwriters Conference, each episode will go behind the scenes highlighting the stories behind the stories. The first season will feature writers and directors from Breaking Bad, Mad Men, Deadwood, True Detective, House of Cards, Freaks and Geeks, Tootsie, Out of Africa, There Will Be Blood, Silence of the Lambs, Ghostbusters, Apollo 13, The Graduate, 12 Years a Slave, Lethal Weapon and Kiss Kiss Bang Bang.

“I’ve been listening to the On Story podcast for some time and am delighted to work with the Austin Film Festival to bring this great content to radio. I think listeners are going to love how much fun this hour is.” – Hawk Mendenhall, Director Broadcast and Content at KUT

The show will premiere on February 16th, with 10 installments airing the third Monday of every month at 9PM CST. The current schedule will include luminaries such as Paul Thomas Anderson, Judd Apatow, Shane Black, Jonathan Demme, Jay and Mark Duplass, Paul Feig, Cary Fukunaga, Vince Gilligan, Noah Hawley, Buck Henry, Ron Howard, Jenny Lumet, David Milch, Jeff Nichols, Sydney Pollack, Harold Ramis, John Ridley, Matthew Weiner, Larry Wilmore, and Beau Willimon. More information is available at www.onstory.tv.

READ MORE

First Confirmed Panelists!

We are pleased to announce our first confirmed panelists for the 2015 Austin Film Festival and Screenwriters Conference, held October 29-November 1. This year’s Conference will feature an equal focus on film and television, the creative and business sides, and more opportunities to network with your peers and storytelling icons! Take it from us: Austin in October is the place to be for inspiration, education, …

We are pleased to announce our first confirmed panelists for the 2015 Austin Film Festival and Screenwriters Conference, held October 29-November 1. This year’s Conference will feature an equal focus on film and television, the creative and business sides, and more opportunities to network with your peers and storytelling icons! Take it from us: Austin in October is the place to be for inspiration, education, and motivation to take your script to the next level.

 

Andrea Berloff writer World Trade Center, Blood Father (2015)
Michael Botti Manager at Industry Entertainment
Matthew Gross President, EuropaCorp TV Studios
Barry Josephson Josephson Entertainment; producer Enchanted, Hide and Seek, The Last Boy Scout, Someone Marry Barry; executive producer Turn, Bones
Casper Kelly creator/writer/director Too Many Cooks, Your Pretty Face Is Going to Hell; writer Squidbillies
Craig Kestel Agent at WME Entertainment
Adam Kolbrenner co-founder Madhouse Entertainment
Gary Lennon producer Black Box, Orange is the New Black, Justified, The Shield
David Lowery writer/director Ain’t Them Bodies Saints, Pioneer, Pete’s Dragon (2016), writer Pit Stop
Jenny Lumet writer Rachel Getting Married
Maggie Malone Head of Creative Affairs at Disney Animation Studios
Kelly Marcel writer Saving Mr. Banks, Fifty Shades of Grey; writer/executive producer Terra Nova
Craig Mazin co-host ScriptNotes, writer Identity Thief, The Hangover Parts II & III, Scary movie 3 & 4, Rocketman
Phil Rosenthal writer/director Exporting Raymond; creator Everybody Loves Raymond
Terry Rossio writer Shrek, Aladdin, the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise, Déjà Vu, The Mask of Zorro, co-creator of Wordplay (wordplayer.com)
John Swetnam writer Step Up: All In, Evidence, Into the Storm, Breaking Through
Ron Yerxa producer Bona Fide Productions, Nebraska, Little Miss Sunshine, Ruby Sparks, Election, Cold Mountain, The Ice Harvest, executive producer The Leftovers

All speakers and events are based on permitting schedules and subject to change and/or cancellation without notice. 

Stay tuned for regular panelist announcements, and check our website regularly for new additions.

READ MORE
Shop