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AFF Interview: Writer/Director Justin Paul Miller, The Sound and The Shadow

For this week’s AFF Interview, our Film Department Apprentice, Dylan Levy, posed a series of questions to Justin Paul Miller, the writer and director of the AFF 2013 Film The Sound and The Shadow! AFF is hosting a screening of The Sound and The Shadow Friday, October 24 and Wednesday, October 29 at the IMAX Theatre. Join AFF and The Sound and The Shadow Writer/Director Justin Paul Miller and other cast and crew for the screening!

Dylan Levy | 10.20.2014

For this week’s AFF Interview, our Film Department Apprentice, Dylan Levy, posed a series of questions to Justin Paul Miller, the writer and director of the AFF 2014 Film The Sound and The Shadow! AFF is hosting a screening of The Sound and The Shadow Friday, October 24 and Wednesday, October 29 at the IMAX Theatre. Join AFF and The Sound and The Shadow Writer/Director Justin Paul Miller and other cast and crew for the screening!

 

Dylan Levy: The film’s tone is very diverse, ranging from light and quirky to thrilling and even terrifying.  How was the process in finding the right tone for this film?  Did it differ significantly from what you originally envisioned?

The Sound and The Shadow Writer/Director Justin Paul Miller: In writing the film, we really tried to take an active approach to  tone. Our characters are very quirky to begin with. But the contrast of using a somewhat lighter tone with a heavy subject matter is more meant to reflect Ally and Harold’s notion of their world rather than just highlight their comedic qualities. They are naïve in their approach to solving the missing girl case. And as they tumble into this adventure we use that shift in tone and genre to mirror the excitement and danger of being amateur gumshoes. In these roles they give themselves, there is a deterioration of innocence that the tone is trying to convey. So we aimed to have the tone evolve with them through the story. Sometimes that evolution was sudden. And we did want certain moments to feel like a punch in the gut from what the audience might feel the “rules” of the world were. But these moments still needed to be digestible. Music also plays a big role in our tone circus. (More on that later)

DL: Given the subject matter and plot, it’s difficult not to think of such other iconic “domestic spy” films such as Rear Window, The Conversation, and Blow-Up.  What films, books, or other creative works were particularly influential in the making of this film? 

JPM: Yes. Rear Window is my favorite Hitchcock film.  It really is THE domestic spy film. Hitchcock is genius in his ability to create suspense in the very technique and parameters of how the story is told. But Rear Window is also about the relationship of it’s characters (Stewart and Kelly) and the sacrifices they make for each other. For me, that is really where it differs from The Conversation and Blow-Up in the genre (though they are all great movies). So I see us following, attempting to at least, more in Hitchcock’s footsteps in that we are using one story to help tell another.

Also, I think Haruki Murakami’s work was influential. Some years back, Sam, the co-writer and producer, turned me on to him. We were both reading his books while writing the film and I think that some of his writing did leave a stamp on the film because we were constantly talking about how Murakami tells his stories. His mysteries unfold in these often fantastical and surrealistic ways. In his work, there is a sense of the world morphing and conspiring against the main characters that underline themes of alienation and invasion. The push and pull of those two thematic forces was really what we were getting at while writing the script for The Sound and the Shadow, so perhaps we have Haruki to thank for some inspiration.

DL: Given that sound recording itself is a central plot element, how did you approach the film’s score and overall sound design?  What did you want the soundtrack to contribute to the film? 

JPM: In Rear Window (segue!!), I love how James Stewart’s camera is not only a big narrative and plot device but also informs his character by letting us look through his lens so to speak. That is something we strived to do with Harold. The way he treats his microphones and sound recordings is almost motherly. And sound is his main tool of perception. In limiting Harold to make his judgments almost entirely through sound an inherent suspense is built. So the sound design itself is subjective – the sound design picks out specific sounds that he is picking out by highlighting them in the mix. We really aim to tell the story through his ears.

Also, the relationship of off-screen sound to space is integral in defining and understanding the neighborhood that the film takes place in. Eighty percent of the movie is told in Harold’s house. In the film we are constantly using sound to define relation to the surrounding neighbors and allude to clues of the characters’ whereabouts. Even in heavy dialogue scenes, the background sound design is meant to highlight a specific aspect of the neighborhood. Our sound designer, Kevin Rosen-Quan did some awesome work in creating a true sound map of the film’s setting.

Which brings us to the music! It was a wonder to watch Layla Minoui-Hall develop the score. While developing our themes and instrumentations, Layla and I studied the score that Nino Rota did for Fellini’s Casanova – another film with quite a wild tone ride. (Listen to that Nino Rota score, its great stuff) We wanted to be able to take a musical theme from whimsical to haunting over the course of the film – reflecting tone. So Layla experimented with altering instrumentations, reversing and inverting melodies, changing time and key signatures. So the score itself undergoes a transformation with the story and interacts with sound design to voice the world that is surrounding and conspiring with our characters.

Layla, Sam, myself, and other cast and crew will all be in attendance at the Friday 24th 9:30p Bullock IMAX screening and would love to talk to you. So come see (and hear) the film!

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AFF Interview: Writer/Director Ricky Kennedy, The History of Time Travel

For this week’s AFF Interview, our Film Department Apprentice, Dylan Levy, posed a series of questions to Ricky Kennedy, the writer and director of the AFF 2014 Film The History of Time Travel! AFF is hosting a screening of The History of Time Travel Saturday, October 25 and Wednesday, October 29 at the Alamo Drafthouse Village. Join AFF and The History of Time Travel writer/director Ricky Kennedy for the screening!

Dylan Levy | 10.20.2014

For this week’s AFF Interview, our Film Department Apprentice, Dylan Levy, posed a series of questions to Ricky Kennedy, the writer and director of the AFF 2014 Film The History of Time Travel! AFF is hosting a screening of The History of Time Travel Saturday, October 25 and Wednesday, October 29 at the Alamo Drafthouse Village. Join AFF and The History of Time Travel writer/director Ricky Kennedy for the screening!

Dylan Levy: What was the writing and planning process like for this film? How did you approach such a tricky concept as time travel, specifically in the context of a fictional documentary?

The History of Time Travel Writer/Director Ricky Kennedy: The writing process for The History of Time Travel took place over several phases from August 2010 to May of 2013. Before I even came up with a storyline I first developed the concept of a time travel documentary. I had wanted to do a high concept film, specifically in the science fiction genre, but couldn’t think of a way to do so economically.

After weeks of thinking about various ideas and concepts the thought occurred to me that doing a time travel movie in a documentary style could be a way to tell an interesting story.

I wouldn’t have to worry about elaborate sets or special effects because the bulk of principal photography could be devoted to interviews which we could film quickly and efficiently. The rest of the film could be photographs we stage and stock footage and photos from the public domain.

I quickly realized that if there was a documentary about time travelers they would inevitably change history at some point. However how would the people being interviewed know this? They wouldn’t. For everyone but the time travelers the changes would go completely unnoticed. Suddenly my film had hook. A documentary about time travel where the facts keep changing because of time travel.

Within a few minutes I had the title, the tagline “Would We Even Notice?, poster design, and film outline sketched out on a piece of notebook paper.

Now that I had a concept I needed to develop a story to fit within that concept. That took about four months, from August to December of 2010. I would write ideas and outlines and pitch them to Daniel and Dudley May (both would work on the film as an actor and as assistant director). Just working on the mechanics of how time travel would function and what the rules would be took months and months to figure out.

The first draft was about twenty four pages and consisted of wall to wall dialog without any cutaways, reenactments, or photographs mentioned. It was just the story as told by the interviewer characters. The first draft would later been adapted as a five minute proof of concept video I filmed as my first graduate film at Stephen F. Austin State University.

I put the script on the back burner for about a years and a half while I made two other short films. When it came time to make my thesis I pulled the script back out and started expanding it to feature length. For the most part the storyline did not change drastically it was just a matter of expanding and fleshing out the characters and events of the story.

DL: Because of the tricky and often paradoxical notion of time travel, many time-travel narratives simply accept the logical fallacies in favor of dramatic effect. Were there any paradoxes you tried to overcome? Were there any you accepted for the purpose of a more compelling narrative?

RK: During the development process I worked very hard to try and avoid paradoxes and plot holes but after you’ve twisted your brain for months and months you just have to stop and ask yourself “Is the story working?”

I read in an interview or article, I believe it was Rian Johnson discussing his film Looper, that time travel is messy and that no matter how hard you try there are going to be plot holes, loose threads or paradoxes.

Time travel by it’s very nature is not logical, it’s impossible to make something illogical into something logical. So the idea with a time travel story is to make is seem like its logical, at least for the duration of the film’s running time. If I’ve done my job well you will suspend disbelief and just accept the story.

However one of the great things about time travel movies is the pleasure I get in taking them apart and trying to make sense of their rules. I love Back to the Future but there’s a plot hole in the trilogy you can fly a delorean through. I won’t mention what it is but it doesn’t make the film any less enjoyable.

I’m looking forward to seeing my film get picked apart and analyzed by the sci-fi fans out there. If they enjoy the film I hope they’ll forgive me for the errors and mistakes I’m sure I’ve overlooked.

DL: It’s immediate to the audience that the film is fictional, even playfully exaggerated. Were you ever concerned that the “tongue-in-cheek” nature of the film would overshadow the film’s dramatic merits or would make it difficult for audiences to emotionally invest in the film?

RK: I always try to make a movie I would want to see and hope other people like it as well but I honestly had know idea how an audience was going to react to the film. I wasn’t sure if they would understand it or just be confused.

With The History of Time Travel I had a very complex story told in an unusually way but I still needed it to be accessible to audiences. Humor was one way to do that. Within the first two minutes I have the character of General Sanborn call time travel a bunch of bull. It get’s a big laugh with every audience I’ve seen it with and let’s them know immediately that this is going to be fun. I think an element of humor helps balance some of the darker aspects of the film because there are some very serious moments in the film.

With The History of Time Travel I had something I thought people might enjoy but depending on the crowd they could enjoy it for different aspects. Some might enjoy the sci-fi elements more, or find the alternate histories interesting, or appreciate the humor and the absurdity of the whole thing, but in the end I hoped everyone would enjoy the film as a whole and find it entertaining and engaging.

Want to add The History of Time Travel to your schedule? Click here to add it to your sched!

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Staff Pick: All Relative

Welcome to our 2014 Festival Staff Picks column! We’ll be posting some first looks at Festival Films to look out for on the 2014 Film Schedule. Check back to the AFF blog for new Staff Picks each week!
All Relative

Allison Kindred | 10.20.2014

Welcome to our 2014 Festival Staff Picks column! We’ll be posting some first looks at Festival Films to look out for on the 2014 Film Schedule. Check back to the AFF blog for new Staff Picks each week!

 

 

 

All Relative

A scandalous twist on “Meet the Parents,” All Relative leaves you rooting for the guy who gets all the ladies and cringing with uncomfortable moments. However, while you’re cringing and rooting the story leaves you wanting to know what happens next, keeps your eyes glued to the screen and gives you a lesson in the end. The twists and turns through out the film happen quickly and you have to keep up so make sure to pay attention!

A wonderful film not only about the first meeting of the parents, but love and relationships whether they are just starting out, have been through 30+ years of marriage or as close as family members. It gives you a great reminder to talk through things and the best relationships are based on honesty. The audience will leave with the valuable lesson to take a look at those relationships in your life and think “we need to have an honest talk”- it might be scary, but it could be the best thing to keep going and revitalize the bond!

Do yourself a favor and schedule this film in your Sched to teach you a lesson, make you laugh, cry, worry and enjoy a great story!

-Allison Kindred, Development Director

Want to add All Relative to your schedule? Click here to add it to your sched!

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A special preview of John Ridley’s American Crime, Plus Mike Birbiglia, Sarah Chalke, Austin Nichols and Jason Ritter join cast for live script reading of Flarsky, co-presented by AFF & and The Black List

Austin Film Festival announces a special preview of John Ridley’s American Crime
premiering in Spring 2015 on the ABC Television Network

Mike Birbiglia, Sarah Chalke, Austin Nichols and Jason Ritter join cast for live script reading of Flarsky, co-presented by Austin Film Festival and The Black List

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Austin Film Festival announces a special preview of John Ridley’s American Crime
premiering in Spring 2015 on the ABC Television Network

Mike Birbiglia, Sarah Chalke, Austin Nichols and Jason Ritter join cast for live script reading of Flarsky, co-presented by Austin Film Festival and The Black List

 

Austin, TX – October 15, 2014– Austin Film Festival (October 23-30), the premier film festival recognizing writers’ and filmmakers’ contributions to film, television and new media, released today new television programming and the lead cast for their annual staged script reading.

Austin Film Festival (AFF) will present a special preview of ABC’s American Crime at the State Theatre, starring Felicity Huffman, Timothy Hutton, and W. Earl Brown among others in a talented ensemble cast. American Crime was written, directed and executive produced by Oscar® winning screenwriter John Ridley (12 Years a Slave) and is produced by ABC Studios.

Whit Stillman (Damsels in Distress, Metropolitan), will present excerpts from The Cosmopolitans, a Paris-set original program from Amazon Studios starring Adam Brody and Chloë Sevigny.

American Crime and The Cosmopolitans join a television slate that includes a preview of Bravo’s first original scripted series, Girlfriends Guide to Divorce, with creator Marti Noxon in attendance.  AFF’s Screenwriters Conference, held the first four days of the Festival, will include panels featuring the director of True Detective, creators of Mad Men, Masters of Sex, Fargo, Better Call Saul, My So-Called Life, Turn, Hemlock Grove, and writers/producers behind Bob’s Burgers, Breaking Bad, Justified, Nashville, Archer, and more.

The 2014 annual staged script-reading will feature the comedy Flarsky, by Dan Sterling (writer The Office, The Interview) in a live event co-presented by The Black List.  Featured cast includes Mike Birbiglia (Sleepwalk with Me), Sarah Chalke (Scrubs), Jason Ritter (Parenthood), and Austin Nichols (One Tree Hill).

Flarsky is a romantic comedy about a decent guy, battered by misfortune and his own self-destructive ways, who endeavors to romantically pursue the most powerful woman on earth.

Past readings have included staged presentations of unproduced screenplays such as Vince Gilligan’s 2 Face, Shane Black’s The Nice Guys, Maggie Carey’s The To-Do List, and an unaired episode of David Milch’s Luck, written by Eric Roth.

Find the full Film and Conference schedule at, www.austinfilmfestival.com.


 

ABOUT AFF:

AFF is a non-profit organization dedicated to furthering the art, craft, and business of filmmakers and screenwriters. AFF is funded and supported in part by a grant from the Texas Commission on the Arts, City of Austin Economic Growth & Redevelopment Services Office/Cultural Arts Division believing an investment in the Arts is an investment in Austin’s future.  Badges/passes are available for purchase at www.austinfilmfestival.com or by phone at 1-800-310-FEST.

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